New Mexico alder: Alnus oblongifolia

This substantial tree, Alnus oblongifolia, was common along the streams of the area around Kingston, NM. Carter (1997) lists its common names as New Mexico or Arizona alder, and notes that it can be found at 5500-7500 feet (1680-2300 m). The tiny cones pictured here are characteristic and the easiest feature to use in identification. This tree was photographed along the Gila National Forest road 157S.
This substantial tree, <em>Alnus oblongifolia</em>, was common along the streams of the area around Kingston, NM.  The tiny cones pictured here are characteristic and the easiest feature to use in identification.
Botanical Characteristics:

More information and pictures:

Close-up of <em>Alnus oblongifolia</em> buds.
Close-up of Alnus oblongifolia buds, photographed along the Gila National Forest road 157S on 4 January 2007.
Close-up of Alnus oblongifolia catkins in very early spring, photographed along the Gila National Forest road 157S on 4 January 2007.
Close-up of <em>Alnus oblongifolia</em> catkins in very early spring.
Bark of <em>Alnus oblongifolia</em>.
Bark of Alnus oblongifolia, photographed along the Gila National Forest road 157S on 4 January 2007. The younger trees had this very smooth appearing bark, while older, bigger trees had more texture to their bark.

Taxonomy:

References:

Books

Cited References:

Carter, Jack L. 1997. Trees and Shrubs of New Mexico. Boulder, CO: Johnson Books, Distributor.
Flowering Plants of New Mexico by Robert Dewitt Ivey, Self-published, (1996)

Web sites


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