Honey mesquite: Prosopis glandulosa

Honey mesquite, Prosopis glandulosa, occurs between 3000 to 5500 feet (910-1680 m) (Carter 1997); photographed at Oliver Lee State Park April 2nd, 2006. Note the pinnately compound leaves seen in this photo of part of this shrub. Carter (1997) notes: "The invasion of Prosopis ssp. into former grasslands of the Southwest is the result of overgrazing a century ago when a military presence was sent combat the Apaches (1865-1890)." Whitson (1999) describes it as native, but weedy and observes that cattle and other livestock find the pods tasty. The USDA plant page for this species records its presence in approximately the lower two-thirds of New Mexico. Additionally, the plant guide on the USDA site has an interesting description of the ethnobotanical uses for this plant.
Honey mesquite, <em>Prosopis glandulosa</em>, leaves and inflorescence.
Botanical Characteristics:

More information and pictures:

Newly emerging inflorescence of honey mesquite, <em>Prosopis glandulosa</em>.
Newly emerging inflorescence of honey mesquite, Prosopis glandulosa, photographed at Oliver Lee State Park April 2nd, 2006.
Older inflorescence of honey mesquite, Prosopis glandulosa, photographed at Oliver Lee State Park April 2nd, 2006.
Older inflorescence of honey mesquite, <em>Prosopis glandulosa</em>.

Where we have seen this plant:

Taxonomy:

References:

Books

Cited references:

Carter, Jack L. 1997. Trees and Shrubs of New Mexico. Boulder, CO: Johnson Books, Distributor
Weeds of the West by Tom D. Whitson, Western Society of Weed Science; 5th edition (January 1999)
Flowering Plants of New Mexico by Robert Dewitt Ivey, Self-published, (1996)

Web sites


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