Douglas fir: Pseudotsuga menziesii

Douglas firs, Pseudotsuga menziesii, are a common and easily identified evergreen in New Mexico forests. They are not true firs. Here, Mike Spilde and Diana stand just in front and to the side of a massive Douglas fir. This overview photo was taken near Cabresto Lake on 3 September 2005.
Overview of a Douglas fir, <em>Pseudotsuga menziesii</em>.
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More information and pictures:

Young cones of a Douglas fir, <em>Pseudotsuga menziesii</em>.
Young cones of a Douglas fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii; note the purple hue that disappears as the cones grow older. The "mouse-tails" that stick out from between cone scales are very distinctive and give the cone a fringed appearance. Note that the cones hang down rather than standing upright as in true firs. Photo taken on the Crest Trail between the parking lot and the tram terminal July 2, 2000.
A serious case of "mousetails" on young cones of a Douglas fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii. Photo taken on Sandia Crest, August, 2000.
A serious case of "mousetails" on young cones of a Douglas fir, <em>Pseudotsuga menziesii</em>.
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